Republished with permission from the International Municipal Lawyers Association (IMLA) with Washington Law commentary from Lee Marchisio, Foster Pepper

Gilleran v. Township of Bloomfield, No. a-15-15 (Sup. Ct. N.J. Nov. 22, 2016)

Denial of access to town’s video security tape footage permissible under [New Jersey’s] Open Public Records Act (“OPRA”) security exemption because footage contained critical information about operating system and vulnerabilities; however, court noted there may be a common law cause of action for releasing portions of footage.

Seeking to determine whether certain people had entered the Township’s municipal building, Plaintiff Patricia Gilleran requested five days’ worth of footage from one of Bloomfield’s stationary security cameras. A clerk for the Township asked that the request be narrowed to a shorter time period, noting that five days of security camera footage was quite voluminous. Accordingly, Gilleran reduced her request to one day of footage and was later informed that her request had been denied under OPRA’s exemption for security information.

Continue Reading No Right of Access to Security Video Footage Revealing Security Capacity for Surveillance System

The New Jersey League of Municipalities (League) is a non-profit, unincorporated association representing over 500 of New Jersey’s municipalities. The League was authorized by the New Jersey Legislature in 1915. One of its functions is serving as a lobbying organization for the state’s municipalities. Its employees are eligible for membership in the New Jersey Public Employee’s Retirement System.

In response to a request for records, the League claimed that it was not a public agency subject to the New Jersey Open Public Records Act (OPRA). The trial court and Court of Appeals agreed with the League. On August 23, 2011, the New Jersey Supreme Court unanimously reversed the lower courts and found that the League was a public agency. Fair Share Housing Center, Inc. v. New Jersey State League of Municipalities, No. 066228. The court distinguished the term “public body” under that state’s Open Public Meetings Act (OPMA), from the term “public agency,” which it found far more encompassing under the OPRA. In contrast to Washington State court decisions, the fact that the New Jersey League was found not to engage in “governmental functions” was not relevant to the inquiry. See the discussion of West v. Washington State Association of Counties (2011) and Telford v. Thurston County Board of Commissioners (1999) in the posting of June 2, 2011: “Washington Association of County Officials Subject to Open Public Meetings Act.” One of the factors considered by Washington courts in determining whether an entity is an “agency” or the “functional equivalent” of an agency and subject to the Washington Public Disclosure Laws is whether the entity performs a governmental function.